The Fire Station

Considerations for Designing and Building "Green" Fire Stations

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(1) Mitchell Associates Architects designs fire stations to use 2x8-inch wood studs with spray foam insulation in between, then sheeting and concrete block facing outside to get to an R22 insulation value. (Photos 1-3 courtesy of Mitchell Associates Architects.)

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(10) The Fairfax (VA) Center Station has a storm water management system, low-flow shower heads and other fixtures, siphon jet urinals, insulated glass tinted with a low-E coating, recycled floor tile, and recycled glass.

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(11) Phoenix (AZ) Fire Station No. 72 is built to LEED certification standards using insulated concrete forms for a high R value, low-VOC paints, and high-E glass. (Photos 11 and 12 courtesy of the Phoenix (AZ) Fire Department.)

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(12) This close-up view shows the construction of high-R value walls in Phoenix (AZ) Fire Department stations using insulated concrete forms, an interior facing material, and an outside facing of concrete block and natural stone.

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(2) This roof array of photovoltaic (PV) panels to generate electricity was installed on this Rensselaer (NY) Fire Department North station designed by Mitchell Associates Architects.

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(3) This modern, ultra-high-efficiency, compact boiler uses PVC as an exhaust flue, has 95 percent efficiency to drive down annual operating costs, has variable frequency ultra-high-efficiency circulators, and extremely low air pollution from nitrous oxide.

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(4) Clerestory windows help provide natural lighting in the apparatus room of this Hilton Head Island (SC) Fire Department station to augment the highly efficient LED lighting. The station, designed by of Stewart Cooper Newell Architects, earned a LEED Silver Award. (Photos 4-7 courtesy of Stewart Cooper Newell Architects.)

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(5) Sustainable elements of the Carrobo (NC) Fire Department station designed by of Stewart Cooper Newell Architects include efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, water-saving features in site landscaping, “green” interior finishes, and an onsite rainwater capture/reuse system.

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(6) This Charlotte (NC) Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Station at Charlotte-Douglas International Airport was designed by Stewart Cooper Newell Architects, has a solar hot water system (shown), high-efficiency HVAC systems and lighting, a 100-kW photovoltaic array to offset energy costs, and uses natural daylighting. The station earned a LEED Silver certification.

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(7) The North Port (FL) Fire Rescue Department and Police Substation No. 82, designed by Stewart Cooper Newell Architects, uses “green” elements such as a rainwater harvesting system, water-conserving fixtures, efficient lighting, and low-/no-VOC finishes.

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(8) The Dale City (VA) Volunteer Fire Department Station No. 10 was designed by Hughes Group Architects using recycled content materials, low-VOC paints and interiors, low-flow water fixture and waterless urinals, and a storm water capture system.

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Green Fire Station Considerations

(9) Hughes Group Architects used plenty of windows for natural light in designing the station for Fairfax Center (VA) Fire and Rescue Station 40.