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Neat Fire Apparatus Features from Bill Adams

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This E-ONE Quest chassis has an 11-lamp LED sequential turn signal located between the warning lights and head lights. I prefer separation between headlamps and the directional and warning lights, however, I’d have to see them in action to pass judgement.

02 / 21

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This E-ONE Quest chassis has an 11-lamp LED sequential turn signal located between the warning lights and head lights. I prefer separation between headlamps and the directional and warning lights, however, I’d have to see them in action to pass judgement.

03 / 21

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Fire departments are trying to make use of every inch of available space on their apparatus. Spartan-ER notched the access door around the slide-in ladder compartment to store pike poles in what otherwise would be dead space. The large grab handle in additional to dual two latches is a nice touch.

04 / 21

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Fire departments are trying to make use of every inch of available space on their apparatus. Spartan-ER notched the access door around the slide-in ladder compartment to store pike poles in what otherwise would be dead space. The large grab handle in additional to dual two latches is a nice touch.

05 / 21

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There was a long, narrow potentially dead space ahead of the operator’s panel on this Toyne rescue-pumper. Mike Watts, Toyne’s national sales manager, said a vertical slide-out board was provided to mount fittings, adapters, and tools commonly found stored flat on a tray or shelf in a separate compartment. Think outside the box. If a $450,000 rescue-pumper has 500-cubic feet of compartment space, look at each cubic foot costing you $950—make good use of each foot.

06 / 21

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There was a long, narrow potentially dead space ahead of the operator’s panel on this Toyne rescue-pumper. Mike Watts, Toyne’s national sales manager, said a vertical slide-out board was provided to mount fittings, adapters, and tools commonly found stored flat on a tray or shelf in a separate compartment. Think outside the box. If a $450,000 rescue-pumper has 500-cubic feet of compartment space, look at each cubic foot costing you $950—make good use of each foot.

07 / 21

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Bill Foster, vice president of Spartan Chassis, Inc., said his people kiddingly call this 15-lamp door-mounted LED sequential directional light the “Foster Light.”

08 / 21

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Bill Foster, vice president of Spartan Chassis, Inc., said his people kiddingly call this 15-lamp door-mounted LED sequential directional light the “Foster Light.”

09 / 21

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KME has its own version of a door-mounted directional light; its mounted on the lower portion of the cab door. (Photo by by Dan Gekoski.)

10 / 21

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KME has its own version of a door-mounted directional light; its mounted on the lower portion of the cab door. (Photo by by Dan Gekoski.)

11 / 21

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This Rosenbauer Smart Cab has a slide-out battery tray on each side beneath the speedlay hose beds. Brian Horrocks, one of the company's Pennsylvania dealers, says depending on the cab and manufacturer it’s a challenge to access batteries to clean, check, or even replace them. (Photo by by Dan Gekoski.)

12 / 21

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This Rosenbauer Smart Cab has a slide-out battery tray on each side beneath the speedlay hosebeds. Brian Horrocks, one of the company's Pennsylvania dealers, says depending on the cab and manufacturer it’s a challenge to access batteries to clean, check, or even replace them. (Photo by by Dan Gekoski.)

13 / 21

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Have you ever seen a firefighter grab a windshield wiper to pull himself up on an extended front bumper so he can stand to clean the windshield? Seagrave solved the problem on this Aerialscope by providing a grab handle on each side. Simple but smart.

14 / 21

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Have you ever seen a firefighter grab a windshield wiper to pull himself up on an extended front bumper so he can stand to clean the windshield? Seagrave solved the problem on this Aerialscope by providing a grab handle on each side. Simple but smart.

15 / 21

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The working end of this Spartan Star Series pumper is well laid out. The hosebed is low enough that a firefighter on the ground can pull and shoulder load any of the four preconnects; the discharges for the preconnects are accessible from ground level at the rear as is a 5-inch LDH inlet. Allan Smith, a Spartan salesperson noted that there’s a short 5-inch LDH curb jumper in the hosebed that’s preconnected. Smith says the preconnected curb jumper serves triple duty: it can be used to make a big fire hookup; it can be used as a filler piece when laying 100-foot lengths of LDH; and it serves as a cap for the inlet. It's obvious this rig’s primary mission is fire suppression.

16 / 21

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The working end of this Spartan Star Series pumper is well laid out. The hosebed is low enough that a firefighter on the ground can pull and shoulder load any of the four preconnects; the discharges for the preconnects are accessible from ground level at the rear as is a 5-inch LDH inlet. Allan Smith, a Spartan salesperson noted that there’s a short 5-inch LDH curb jumper in the hosebed that’s preconnected. Smith says the preconnected curb jumper serves triple duty: it can be used to make a big fire hookup; it can be used as a filler piece when laying 100-foot lengths of LDH; and it serves as a cap for the inlet. It's obvious this rig’s primary mission is fire suppression.

17 / 21

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18 / 21

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This Seagrave rescue-pumper has a narrow, high hosebed. A close look shows three rear preconnects on slide-out trays. The piping for them is located just above the trays below the main hosebed. Note the short grab handles beneath the treadplate enclosure around the traffic advisory light. That works.

19 / 21

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This is a cab step on a Pierce custom pumper. There’s a six-lamp LED light recessed into it. The rig also has the same lights recessed into the rub rails down the length of the apparatus. I guess they could be programmed for area work lighting, directional lighting, or even auxiliary warning lights. It’s a neat idea.

20 / 21

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Most fire departments can’t afford to park a firefighter in front of a pump panel for an entire incident, so a common sight on many rigs these days are lights on all sides indicating the booster tank level. They are usually large halogen fixtures or the smaller LED lights similar to the one on this Rosenbauer.

21 / 21

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I find this photo very interesting and dare not comment.