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Fire Apparatus Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

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Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

Photos 1 and 2 show a Smeal pump house with four single-stacked crosslays with hose connections plumbed to the sides of the pump house. Red and blue preconnects pull off the driver’s side and yellow and green are on the passenger’s side. One foam-capable preconnect is plumbed on each side.

02 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

Photos 1 and 2 show a Smeal pump house with four single-stacked crosslays with hose connections plumbed to the sides of the pump house. Red and blue preconnects pull off the driver’s side and yellow and green are on the passenger’s side. One foam-capable preconnect is plumbed on each side.

03 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

The KME in Photo 3 has two speedlays piped to the driver-side pump panel. Note the large pull handles to facilitate removing the trays. Bottom hose rollers are seldom seen anymore—probably because of cost or oversight. On this rig, the roller helps to deploy the preconnect as well as keeping the tray “in place.” It aids in removing the empty tray and reloading a repacked tray. If purchasers don’t spec rollers, they’ll probably not get them. Note the textured look of the pump panel.

04 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

Photos 4 and 5 show a Sutphen pump house with three single-stacked crosslays. The center lay is piped to the driver side and the rear to the passenger side. The forward bed is a dead lay. Note that the telescoping lights mounted on back of the cab do not interfere with the dead lay. Purchasers are cautioned to specify that telescoping lights, mounted tools, and grab handles are not to block hosebeds—or live with the consequences as long as they own the rig.

05 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

Photos 4 and 5 show a Sutphen pump house with three single-stacked crosslays. The center lay is piped to the driver side and the rear to the passenger side. The forward bed is a dead lay. Note that the telescoping lights mounted on back of the cab do not interfere with the dead lay. Purchasers are cautioned to specify that telescoping lights, mounted tools, and grab handles are not to block hosebeds—or live with the consequences as long as they own the rig.

06 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

Photo 6 is another KME with dual single-stacked lays showing one supplied by a driver-side panel discharge.

07 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

The Pierce in Photo 7 has similar lays with one being supplied off the passenger-side panel.

08 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

A common preconnect storage area is below the forward facing seats on rigs with custom cabs. The Marion in photos 8 and 9 shows dual preconnects mounted on permanently mounted slides. They are fed on each side by exposed chicksan swivels located in open compartments below the preconnects.

09 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

A common preconnect storage area is below the forward facing seats on rigs with custom cabs. The Marion in photos 8 and 9 shows dual preconnects mounted on permanently mounted slides. They are fed on each side by exposed chicksan swivels located in open compartments below the preconnects.

10 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

Also a Marion, the pump panels in Photo 10 and 11 are enclosed behind roll-up doors. The truck features a 2½-inch preconnect with a playpipe designed to be pulled from the passenger’s side. A neat idea is the ground monitor mounted at the panel allowing for a quick changeover from a labor-intensive handline to a portable master stream. Note the slide-in back board storage. I don’t know why the upper pump panels appear to be painted smooth black and the lower panels are black vinyl.

11 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

Also a Marion, the pump panels in Photo 10 and 11 are enclosed behind roll-up doors. The truck features a 2½-inch preconnect with a playpipe designed to be pulled from the passenger’s side. A neat idea is the ground monitor mounted at the panel allowing for a quick changeover from a labor-intensive handline to a portable master stream. Note the slide-in back board storage. I don’t know why the upper pump panels appear to be painted smooth black and the lower panels are black vinyl.

12 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

Photos 12 and 13 shows pump panels on two Smeal rigs featuring a black textured finish. I found it interesting that Smeal coated the back sides of pump panels, affording equal corrosion protection on the inside of the pump house. It might be worth spec’ing.

13 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

Photos 12 and 13 shows pump panels on two Smeal rigs featuring a black textured finish. I found it interesting that Smeal coated the back sides of pump panels, affording equal corrosion protection on the inside of the pump house. It might be worth spec’ing.

14 / 17

Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

The full-width cover and decking on the extended bumper of the rig in Photo 14 is covered with what appears to be a relatively smooth textured black paint.

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Crosslay and Speedlay Configurations

The entire bumper assembly on Ferrara’s MVP in Photo 15 is also black—seemingly with a more aggressive finish. Paul Christiansen, aerial sales manager at Ferrara explains it is not a paint but a seamless coating called F-Shield. It has corrosion-resistant properties that are popular among fire departments who have calcium chloride or other deicing agents sprayed on roads during the winter. He says, “We also use this coating everywhere inside our cabs and, as requested by customers, on many exterior components that normally have a bright finish.” When used for under-chassis protection, Ferrara’s specs read: “The chassis frame rails, cross members, fuel tank, and air reservoirs shall be completely encapsulated in a ruggedized, protective coating. The air reservoirs, reservoir hanger straps and fuel tank shall all be treated separately prior to assembly. The frame, cross members, bumper backing reinforcement plate, radiator skid plate, spring hangers, cab lock mounts and required bolts shall all be in place prior to treatment to ensure complete coverage. Christiansen goes on to say that it is a state-of-the art elastomeric membrane with an extremely tough, flexible, and chemical- and abuse-resistant finish. He notes that moving parts, such as steering linkages, cab locks, spring suspensions, axles, and so on, are not be coated with this material, but are be painted with high-quality gloss black paint. Fire departments should be very definitive when writing specifications for “undercoating” and “protective finishes.” Spraying a piece of metal with a can of spray paint is not the same as fully encapsulating it within a membrane. If you want the inside of a pump house protected from corrosion, you should specify how you want it done. Ditto goes for black pump panels. Do you want black vinyl covered or painted black? Smooth or textured?

16 / 17

Low Hosebed Configuration

Photo 16 shows the rear end of a rig with today’s popular low hosebed. It’s got to be easy to work off of with low ladder storage, low preconnect bed, and easily accessible rear discharge. A novel idea is the sliding hosebed cover. There can be drawbacks to low hosebeds—regardless of who builds the truck. The entire width and length of the hosebed above the top of these hosebed dividers does not appear usable. Purchasers should be mindful that manufacturers will build what fire departments specify.

17 / 17

Vintage Pump Panel Configuration

Photo 18 shows an approximately 40-year-old pump panel. I found it interesting that after delivery the fire department marked the reel controls “this side” and “the other side.” They also added “preconnects” above the factory-supplied labels with just numbers and small tags reading “1½ front” and “1½ rear.” Purchasers might want to consider specifying control labels’ size, color, and script to meet their individual requirements and not what a manufacturer may have as its standard. You don’t often see “turret” on a pump panel!