Slide Show

01 / 19

Photo 1

Mack built its fully enclosed sedan cab in 1935. This 1939 sedan cab, built "around" the fire pump, was a common configuration. Some manufacturers are reintroducing variations of the concept today. (Photo 1 is a delivery photo courtesy of Harvey Eckart; photos 2-19 courtesy of CustomFIRE.)

02 / 19

Photo 10

A passenger side view of a crew module shows how forward- and rear-facing light bars can be recessed into the module. Some manufacturers have standard crew cab lengths (front to rear) and heights. Others will custom build around individual customer requirements.

03 / 19

Photo 11

An independent free-standing crew cab enclosure can also be supplied on a custom cab and chassis. This unit features a two-door custom cab. The three speedlays were designed into the apparatus body, one mounted above the other two.

04 / 19

Photo 12

The extended-length crew cab module on this big Peterbuilt 365 has three 2½-inch speedlays located side by side behind a drop-down door. The large handles on the pump access panel facilitate removal for servicing. This rig features a full-bodied, two-stage 1,500-gpm pump.

05 / 19

Photo 13

The Freightliner M2 two-door is a common cab and chassis used for crew cab modules. This rig features the typical dual 1¾-inch speedlays with removable trays behind a lift-up door.

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Photo 14

The Freightliner M2 two-door is a common cab and chassis used for crew cab modules. This rig features the typical dual 1¾-inch speedlays with removable trays behind a lift-up door.

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Photo 15

This enclosed top-mount operator's panel features both manual and electric valve controls allowing an additional seat just visible on the left side. The D-ring handle below the panel unlatches an interior pump-house access panel. Also visible is an NFPA-compliant helmet holder-an item not easily located in today's smaller custom cabs.

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Photo 16

This design shows an enclosed top-mount operator's panel with electric valve controls, which allows seating (or extra compartmentation) on each side of the panel.

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Photo 17

These photos show various SCBA seating any manufacturer should be able to provide in a crew cab module. Photo 17 shows four abreast. Divide the actual interior width by the number of seats to find the available space per firefighter.

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Photo 18

Photo 18 shows three abreast. It also shows "helmet holder" compartments in each upper corner.

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Photo 19

Photo 19 shows two seats with an EMS module located between them. Most manufacturers building customized crew cab modules should be able to accommodate a fire department's unique seating requirements.

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Photo 2

CustomFIRE's first two rigs with Full Response Cabs on Ford conventional engine-ahead-chassis were delivered to St. Paul in 1985. The pump was mounted immediately behind the chassis cab with an exposed side-mount operator's panel.

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Photo 3

Cab design improvements included lengthening the crew module and adding more windows, including in the lower portion of the module doors.

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Photo 4

This 2013 variation of a short (front-to-rear) crew cab enclosure on a Peterbuilt 348 with a side-mount operator's panel shows the fire pump mounted aft of the crew cab door immediately ahead of the apparatus body. This customer preferred rear preconnects rather than speedlays incorporated into the cab.

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Photo 5

An International 7500 shows a common crew cab design, including an enclosed top-mount operator's panel with speedlays located beneath the rear-facing seating area. Speedlays are enclosed behind treadplate doors as is a frame-rail-depth compartment below them.

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Photo 6

This big Kenworth T800 has the side hose connections protected by roll-up doors.

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Photo 7

Compare the various sizes and locations of crew cab windows in this article. Many custom manufacturers will locate and design them around "what's inside" each module. Windows are located only on the rear and both sides of the module on this Peterbuilt 348 equipped with a 1,750-gpm pump. Most manufacturers' top-mount pump designs allow large-diameter discharges on each side of the rig.

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Photo 8

The driver side pump connections and the speedlays are both protected by roll-up doors on this Kenworth T370, also equipped with a 1,750-gpm pump. The front- and rear-facing crew cab windows were eliminated in favor of interior overhead compartmentation. An auxiliary step is provided under the crew cab door.

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Photo 9

The driver side pump connections and the speedlays are both protected by roll-up doors on this Kenworth T370, also equipped with a 1,750-gpm pump. The front- and rear-facing crew cab windows were eliminated in favor of interior overhead compartmentation. An auxiliary step is provided under the crew cab door.