Adams | Aerials | Apparatus | Features | Pumpers | Rescues

Fire Truck Observations from the Trade Show Circuit

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Photo 1. A Spartan ER pumper for export which has a unique slide-out SCBA holder. It pivots perpendicular to the rig and has four SCBA brackets on one side and five on the other. Photo by author.

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Photos 10 and 11. A KME heavy rescue with 42-inch wide stairs with under-step storage areas. Decent-length handrails are provided on each side at the rear and on the stairs. Access and egress to upper compartments should be made safe especially when carrying large/heavy equipment. Photos by author.

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Photos 10 and 11. A KME heavy rescue with 42-inch wide stairs with under-step storage areas. Decent-length handrails are provided on each side at the rear and on the stairs. Access and egress to upper compartments should be made safe especially when carrying large/heavy equipment. Photos by author.

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Photo 12. A unique black over orange paint scheme on a Marion fire apparatus. Narrow-width beavertails feature smaller round lights. LED light manufacturers have myriad compliant fixtures to fit custom designs. The rig also features a swing-out, full-sized rear access ladder to the top with “a place to stand” after you get there! Photo by author.

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Photo 13. A grab handle on the cab of a pumper to assist stepping onto the bumper’s gravelshield when cleaning the windshield. It’s a good idea, saving wear and tear on the windshield wiper arms, and was on several rigs. Does the stepping surface and the height of the step up from the ground to the bumper have to meet NFPA 1901 requirements? Photo by author.

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Photos 2 and 3. A rear LDH connection on a Seagrave tractor-drawn aerial. It is a purposely designed recessed connection keeping the fitting inboard of the rear of the apparatus. It is low enough to eliminate using a 30 degree fitting. It would be a nice feature to have on pumpers with short or no rear steps, keeping the plumbing from taking the first hit in the event of a mishap. Photo by author.

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Photos 2 and 3. A rear LDH connection on a Seagrave tractor-drawn aerial. It is a purposely designed recessed connection keeping the fitting inboard of the rear of the apparatus. It is low enough to eliminate using a 30 degree fitting. It would be a nice feature to have on pumpers with short or no rear steps, keeping the plumbing from taking the first hit in the event of a mishap. Photo by author.

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Photo 4. An HME-Ahrens Fox aerial with a low-mounted rear hose connection for the aerial. It features an extended running board (rear work platform) to protect the plumbing and also the body in the event of an accident. Photo by author.

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Photo 5. Another aerial device with a low-mounted rear hose connection. Purchasers should inform OEMs if LDH fittings will be permanently mounted after delivery to ensure they are kept inboard of the running boards (per NFPA 1901) and the tailboard (if you care). Photo by author.

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Photo 6. Summit’s pumper has a different ladder storage configuration in the hosebed—three ladders are stacked flat with a slide-out storage tray above it. It’s the first rig I’ve seen with a third combination tail/stop light center mounted below the hosebed—a neat idea. Photo by author.

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Photo 7. An E-ONE pumper that features a low hosebed with hinged lift-up hosebed covers, three low-mounted rear discharges, an intermediate step, and a decent-sized rear step. It's designed to make life easy and efficient for the hose crew. Photo by author.

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Photo 8. A Toyne pumper with a low-mounted 6-inch rear suction and a 2½-inch direct tank fill, both protected by a decent-sized rear platform. This rig also features a roll-up hosebed cover. Photo by author.

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Although Pierce displays new innovations and designs, it always brings what I call a real pumper to each show. Photo 9 shows a traditional pumper with ground ladders on the side, a low, deep hosebed, multiple dividers, and low-mounted rear discharges. It further illustrates what I believe is an industry return to real rear work platforms on real working pumpers. Photo by author.