Special Delivery: Rosenbauer Builds Rescue-Pumper for Markle (IN) Fire Department

BY ALAN M. PETRILLO

The Markle Fire Department wanted to replace its second-due engine with an up-to-date apparatus that could function as a rescue-pumper with emergency medical services (EMS) capabilities as well as carry a compressed air foam system (CAFS).

The apparatus committee started its search in 2018 at FDIC International and narrowed its focus down to three apparatus manufacturers.

John Gray, Markle’s chief, says, “We had an old engine that we bought from Fort Wayne City and refurbished and also a Ford F-550 that we had set up for rescue and EMS responses. We wanted to sell both and purchase a new rescue-pumper, so we sat down and decided what we had to have on that single vehicle.” Gray says after the committee’s FDIC visit, it met with three manufacturers to determine what each of them could offer the department. “Our department is funded by four townships and the town of Markle, so we laid out all three possibilities to the trustees, and Rosenbauer was both their choice and ours,” Gray points out.

Gray says that because the department covers 13 miles of Interstate 69, it wanted the rescue-pumper set up with rescue equipment housed on the officer’s side and fire suppression equipment on the driver’s side. “We also wanted everything enclosed behind rollup doors,” he adds, “because we had to have all our equipment protected from the weather and the salt used on Indiana’s roads in winter. Plus, we wanted to be sure to have a CAFS on the vehicle.”

Rosenbauer built this rescue-pumper on an Avenger chassis and cab with an 11-inch raised roof, a Rosenbauer stainless steel N Series 1,500-gpm pump, a 750-gallon water tank, a 30-gallon foam cell, and a FoamPro Pneumax Model 200-P CAFSystem™ Class A foam system.

1 Rosenbauer built this rescue-pumper on an Avenger chassis and cab with an 11-inch raised roof, a Rosenbauer stainless steel N Series 1,500-gpm pump, a 750-gallon water tank, a 30-gallon foam cell, and a FoamPro Pneumax Model 200-P CAFSystem™ Class A foam system. (Photos 1-4 courtesy of Sentinel Emergency Solutions.)


department

Markle (IN) Fire Department

Strength: 22 volunteer firefighters; one station.

Service area: Provides fire suppression, rescue, and first responder EMS to approximately 30,000 people in 130 square miles of Huntington and Wells counties in Indiana.

Other apparatus: 2009 Darley Spartan engine, 1,250-gpm pump, 750-gallon water tank, 25-gallon foam cell, Darley CAFS; 1999 E-ONE tanker, 1,250-gpm pump, 1,850-gallon water tank; ex-military Humvee brush truck, Darley skid unit pump, 300-gallon water tank, 10-gallon foam cell; 2020 RAM 1500 pickup EMS first responder vehicle; Howe rescue boat equipped with sonar and Evinrude 25-horsepower outboard motor.


Roger Parker, central regional sales manager for Rosenbauer, says the rescue-pumper is on an Avenger chassis and cab and is the first Avenger pumper delivered in Indiana. “It’s also a first because it has a Rosenbauer N series stainless steel pump,” Parker adds. The Markle rescue-pumper has a 70-inch cab and 11-inch raised roof with seating for six firefighters, five of them in Seats Inc.’s 911 XL self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) seats.

Parker notes that the rig is powered by a 450-horsepower (hp) Cummins L9 engine and an Allison 3000 EVS automatic transmission and has a Hendrickson parabolic springs front suspension and a Hendrickson air ride rear suspension. The wheelbase on the rescue-pumper is 199 inches, the overall length is 34 feet 11 inches, and the overall height is 9 feet 9 inches.

Todd Roempagel, the salesperson at Sentinel Emergency Solutions who sold the rescue-pumper to Markle, says the vehicle has a Rosenbauer N Series 1,500-gallon-per minute (gpm) power takeoff (PTO) stainless steel pump with lever bank controls, a 750-gallon polypropylene water tank, a 30-gallon foam cell, and a FoamPro Pneumax model 200-P CAFSystem™ Class A foam system. He notes that the rig’s foam system has an auto-fill feature that allows the system to be automatically filled from foam buckets placed alongside the pumper.

The rescue-pumper is powered by a 450-horsepower Cummins L9 diesel engine and an Allison 3000 EVS automatic transmission.

2 The rescue-pumper is powered by a 450-horsepower Cummins L9 diesel engine and an Allison 3000 EVS automatic transmission.

he rear features two 200-foot 1¾-inch hose crosslays in a compartment in the rear bumper and a ladder tunnel that stores ground ladders horizontally in a through-the-tunnel compartment covered by a roll-up door.

3 The rear features two 200-foot 1¾-inch hose crosslays in a compartment in the rear bumper and a ladder tunnel that stores ground ladders horizontally in a through-the-tunnel compartment covered by a roll-up door.

The pump panel has a display screen that can show images from all of the vehicle’s four digital cameras. Another camera display screen is in the cab.

4 The pump panel has a display screen that can show images from all of the vehicle’s four digital cameras. Another camera display screen is in the cab.

Firefighters are shown training with rescue equipment carried on the officer’s side of the new rig.

5 Firefighters are shown training with rescue equipment carried on the officer’s side of the new rig. (Photo 5 courtesy of the Markle Fire Department.)


specs

Rosenbauer Avenger Rescue-Pumper

  • Rosenbauer Avenger R7011 chassis and 70-inch cab with 11-inch raised roof
  • Seating in cab for six firefighters; five in Seats Inc. SCBA seats
  • Wheelbase: 199 inches
  • Overall length: 34 feet 11 inches
  • Overall height: 9 feet 9 inches
  • Cummins 450-hp L9 engine
  • Allison 3000 EVS automatic transmission
  • Rosenbauer N Series 1,500-gpm PTO pump
  • 750-gallon polypropylene water tank
  • 30-gallon foam cell
  • FoamPro Pneumax model 200-P CAFSystem™ Class A foam system
  • Lever bank pump controls
  • Rear bumper crosslays
  • Low hosebed

Mike Grant, a Markle lieutenant who was part of the truck committee, says the rescue-pumper carries 150 feet of 1¾-inch hose that can flow compressed-air foam (CAF) in a compartment on the extended front bumper, two 200-foot 1¾-inch hose crosslays in the rear bumper that can flow CAF, 200 feet of 2½-inch hose and 200 feet of 1¾-inch hose in crosslays that can flow only water located above the side-mount pump panel, and 200 feet of one-inch booster line hose on a reel in a covered compartment on top of the rig in the dunnage area.

“We put the rear bumper crosslays on the pumper because it’s a tall vehicle, and we wanted to keep them low,” Grant points out. “We need this truck to fight fires, but we also wanted it to have the ability to handle rescue calls with our Hurst eDraulic® tools and do both firefighting and rescue well.” He adds that the rig’s hosebed carries 1,200 feet of three-inch supply line and 800 feet of 2½-inch hose.

Roempagel notes that Markle’s rescue-pumper has four coffin compartments on top, with the front coffin on the officer’s side having an oil dry hopper that runs down through the body to discharge at the base of the body behind the pump house. A 24-foot two-section extension ladder, a 14-foot roof ladder, and a 10-foot attic ladder are stored horizontally in a through-the-tank compartment covered by a roll-up door. In the lower section of that vented compartment are a K12 saw, a chain saw, and gasoline containers.

“The rescue-pumper has an all-around camera system with a forward-looking camera in the cab, a rearview camera, and cameras at the L1 and R1 compartments on the sides,” Roempagel says. “Camera screens are in the cab and at the pump panel.”

Lighting on the vehicle includes Whelen LED warning lighting, LED laser tracing lighting in the grille that spells out the fire department’s name, a HiViz FireTech LED brow light, a Whelen Legacy LED light bar, four FRC Spectra LED scene lights (two on each side), and one FRC SPA900-Q70 LED light at the rear.


ALAN M. PETRILLOis a Tucson, Arizona-based journalist, the author of three novels and five nonfiction books, and a member of the Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment Editorial Advisory Board. He served 22 years with the Verdoy (NY) Fire Department, including in the position of chief.

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