Special Delivery: Fire Department with Big Need for Pumper-Tanker Turns to Rosenbauer

Alan M. Petrillo

A federal Assistance to Firefighters Grant awarded late in 2010 prompted the formation of a truck committee at the Waynesville (MO) Rural Fire Protection District, a mostly rural 160-square-mile fire district that also serves as a bedroom community to Fort Leonard Wood, home of the United States Army’s Chemical, Engineer, and Military Police Regiments.

Chief Doug Yurecko says the truck committee debated the pros and cons of purchasing a straight tanker vs. a pumper-tanker and eventually won approval from the board of directors to consider the pumper-tanker concept. The timing was perfect, Yurecko says, because the decision came immediately prior to the 2011 Fire Department Instructors Conference (FDIC), which allowed the committee to talk with manufacturers face to face and examine demonstration pumper-tankers and traditional tankers.

“We started out talking about a smaller tanker than our two current 3,600-gallon Ford LN9000 tankers,” Yurecko says. “It’s sometimes awkward getting them into some places in our district, so we were looking for a vehicle carrying 2,000 gallons of water.”

Yurecko, who was acquainted with Roger Parker, Rosenbauer’s northern regional sales manager, stopped by Rosenbauer’s booth and asked Parker to walk him through what they had to offer in demos. “We looked at a traditional tanker they had on the floor and then Roger suggested we look at the Maverick, a pumper-tanker, because of its features, especially the pump-and-roll capability that would be very useful in wildland and urban interface situations,” Yurecko says. “We have both federal and state forest lands in our district, as well as a lot of area inside Fort Leonard Wood.”

Parker says Rosenbauer didn’t have a 2,000-gallon tanker at FDIC but rather a 1,800-gallon model on a single axle. “After looking at that tanker, we showed the chief and his committee the Maverick with its 1,500-gallon water tank, four-wheel drive, and its pump-and-roll capability,” Parker says. “The firefighters liked the idea of being able to attack a fire with high-pressure foam through the remote-controlled turret on the front bumper.”

(1) The Waynesville (MO) Rural Fire Protection District turned to Rosenbauer for a Maverick pumper-tanker, with pump-and-roll capability that's useful in wildland and urban interface scenarios.
(1) The Waynesville (MO) Rural Fire Protection District turned to Rosenbauer for a Maverick pumper-tanker, with pump-and-roll capability that’s useful in wildland and urban interface scenarios. [Photos courtesy of the Waynesville (MO) Rural Fire Protection District.]

Two Hurdles

Two issues were hanging the committee up on deciding in favor of the Maverick, Parker notes. The first was the 1,500-gallon water tank, but Parker convinced them of the vehicle’s handiness with less water. “If you’re trying to take 2,000 gallons of water off road, you’re going to sink,” he says. “The Maverick, carrying less water, and with its four-wheel drive and shorter wheelbase, is much more agile.”

The second issue was the department’s unfamiliarity with the Rosenbauer NH55 1,250-gallon-per-minute (gpm) high-pressure pump. “We showed them a cutaway of the pump, explained how it works, the pressures it idles at, and the Fix Mix system for delivering foam,” Parker says. “Once they understood it, they liked it, as well as the booster reel with one-inch booster hose that can put out 100 gpm at 500 pounds per square inch (psi), with or without foam.”

Once the department overcame these two hurdles, it bought the FDIC demo Maverick within a month, Parker says, although the district allowed Rosenbauer to keep the vehicle on its Tech Drive tour around the country throughout the summer. Waynesville Rural Fire took delivery in September 2011.

(2) The Waynesville Maverick pumper-tanker has a 10-inch electric dump valve with a Rosenbauer swivel dump at the rear and a 2,100-gallon Portatank on a hinge-down rack on the right side.
(2) The Waynesville Maverick pumper-tanker has a 10-inch electric dump valve with a Rosenbauer swivel dump at the rear and a 2,100-gallon Portatank on a hinge-down rack on the right side.

Idle Reduction Technology

Another selling point for the Waynesville firefighters, says Brad Towers, owner and president of Towers Fire Apparatus Co., which sold the Maverick to Waynesville, was Rosenbauer’s Green Star idle reduction technology. Green Star’s auxiliary power unit (APU) has a 1.7-kW diesel generator that allows the main engine to be shut down when idling and still powers all lights, radios, heat, and air conditioning for the vehicle.

Yurecko agrees that Green Star was a big selling point for the department. “The Green Star generator uses only a quart of fuel an hour and doesn’t require any diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) to operate,” he says. “We would have paid $18,000 for a generator on the vehicle but instead got the Green Star unit for $23,000. So, the payout will be less than five years, maybe a lot less because we put a lot of time on our vehicles when we’re sitting and idling.”

He continues, “If the truck’s main engine idles for two minutes, our Green Star shuts it down and the APU runs all electrically powered equipment, including all the 12-volt LED scene and ground lights.”

Parker points out that Green Star also can run the vehicle’s lighting and environmental systems for four hours by using its deep-cell battery backups. “We plan on introducing a new lithium-type battery for our Green Star units at FDIC this year,” Parker says, “so that our Green Star vehicles will have no lead acid batteries on them at all.”

Positive Reception

Yurecko says the Maverick pumper-tanker has been a big hit at the fire district. “Every day the firefighters walk by the unit and say, ‘Wow,’ ” he says. “It drives as well as or better than any of our other apparatus, and putting it into pump at 35 miles per hour (mph) or below is a one-button push.”

(3) The Maverick pumper-tanker that Rosenbauer furnished to the Waynesville (MO) Rural Fire Protection District carries a NH55 1,250-gpm pump with stainless steel plumbing and a 1,500-gallon water tank.
(3) The Maverick pumper-tanker that Rosenbauer furnished to the Waynesville (MO) Rural Fire Protection District carries a NH55 1,250-gpm pump with stainless steel plumbing and a 1,500-gallon water tank.

Yurecko says word of the Maverick’s versatility has spread to neighboring departments, so much so that it has been special-requested on a number of mutual-aid calls. The pumper-tanker also has proven its worth at a recent fire in Waynesville’s district. “We responded to a commercial vehicle fire in a salvage yard and the first engine in pulled an attack line,” Yurecko says. “The Maverick pulled in right behind the engine, engaged the monitor, and knocked down the fire in two minutes without anyone leaving the cab.”

Towers points out that Waynesville was so pleased with the Rosenbauer Maverick that it has ordered another Rosenbauer product from him-a 1,500-gpm 2012 pumper with a 1,000-gallon water tank. “The Rosenbauer pumper will be the first vehicle we’ve ever built from the ground up,” says Yurecko. “Usually we buy demos, but we went back to Rosenbauer because it gave us exactly what we wanted.”

ALAN M. PETRILLO is a Tucson, Arizona-based freelance writer and is a member of the Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment editorial advisory board. He served 22 years with the Verdoy (NY) Fire Department, including in the position of chief.


Rosenbauer Maverick Pumper-Tanker

• Rosenbauer FX aluminum body
• Hot-dipped galvanized subframe
• International 7400 4×4 two-door chassis
• 203-inch wheelbase
• 128-inch cab-to-axle length
• 40,000-pound GVWR
• 14,000-pound front driving axle
• 26,000-pound rear axle
• 315-hp International MaxxForce 9 diesel engine
• 320-amp alternator
• Allison 3000 transmission
• Rosenbauer NH55 1,250-gpm PTO-driven pump with stainless steel plumbing
• Pump normal and high-pressure rated to flow 1,250-gpm volume and 100 gpm at 600 psi simultaneously
• Rosenbauer Fix Mix foam system on high-pressure side of pump
• 1,500-gallon water tank
• 10-inch electric dump valve with Rosenbauer swivel dump
• Task Force Tips (TFT) Tornado 500-gpm monitor in front bumper turret with B-TOS selectable nozzle flowing 15 to 120 gpm
• 2,100-gallon Portatank with hinge down rack on right side of vehicle
• Green Star Auxiliary Battery Pack with Idle Reduction Technology
• Whelen LED light package

Price without equipment: $274,000


Waynesville (MO) Rural Fire Protection District

Strength: 12 full-time and three part-time paid firefighters, 27 volunteer firefighters, in four stations providing fire suppression, rescue, and first responder EMS.

Service area: Covers 160 square miles of mostly rural and some suburban areas, including the city of Waynesville (14 square miles) and second-alarm response to Fort Leonard Wood, home of the United States Army’s Chemical, Engineer, and Military Police Regiments. Population of the fire district is 17,000, exclusive of the daytime population of 40,000 at Fort Leonard Wood.

Other apparatus: 1999 Luverne pumper, 1,500-gpm pump, 1,000-gallon water tank; 1997 KME pumper, 1,500-gpm pump, 780-gallon water tank; 1995 Ferrara pumper, 1,000-gpm pump, 750-gallon water tank; 1971 American LaFrance pumper, 1,500-gpm pump, 500-gallon water tank; 1983 E-ONE 50-foot Telesquirt, 1,000-gpm pump, 300-gallon water tank; 1981 Sutphen 100-foot platform quint, 1,500-gpm pump, 300-gallon water tank; two Ford LN9000 tankers, no pumps, 3,600-gallon water tanks; 1994 Chevrolet rescue with 22-foot walk-in box; two Chevrolet and one Dodge brush trucks, two with skid units, one with portable pump, all three with small water tanks.

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