Pasco County (FL) Fire Rescue Gets E-ONE Rescue-Pumpers, Aerial Ladder

Pasco County Fire Rescue was replacing four front line engines and a 100-foot aerial ladder and turned to its longtime apparatus supplier, E-ONE, to build the rigs.
Pasco County Fire Rescue was replacing four front line engines and a 100-foot aerial ladder and turned to its longtime apparatus supplier, E-ONE, to build the rigs.

While the department wanted to keep the engines similar to its existing pumpers, it wanted to make some modifications to the cab that would improve the integrity of its emergency medical services (EMS) supplies.

“The department is a cross-trained agency in which all paid firefighters are required to be trained as emergency medical technicians (EMTs) or paramedics,” says Chief Scott Cassin. “All of our 26 front line engines are paramedic engines and carry medical equipment for EMS response. With the new pumpers, we decided on a longer cab, which came as a result of a firefighter’s suggestion. We were concerned about the integrity of our EMS supplies because of the warm weather we experience, so we had E-ONE incorporate an additional compartment inside the cab to store our medical supplies in an air-conditioned environment.”

Department

Pasco County (FL) Fire Rescue

Strength: 602 full-time paid firefighters, 73 support staff, nine other personnel; 26 stations.

Service area: The department provides fire protection, rescue, and ALS and EMS to a population of 565,000 residents in 750 square miles of Pasco County including the cities of Dade City, San Antonio, and Saint Leo.

Other apparatus: 26 Type 1 front line engines; 12 reserve engines; five aerial ladder quints; two 100-foot aerial ladders; one 100-foot aerial platform; 12 Type 6 wildland engines; 11 tankers (tenders); one heavy rescue; two air/light units; nine john boats; one Zodiac RIB on the heavy rescue; one decon unit; six battalion chief Ford F-250 pickups with caps and pull-out trays; 40 staff vehicles (pickups, SUVs, sedans).

Chris Beville, REV Fire Group’s REV Technical Center sales account manager for northern Florida, says that instead of the 58-inch cab that E-ONE put on Pasco County’s previous pumpers, the four new engines have 80-inch-long cabs that incorporate 24-inch-wide advanced life support (ALS) cabinets at the backs of the cabs, accessible from both inside and outside the rigs. “The ALS cabinet has a 110-volt air-conditioning system that keeps the medical equipment and supplies cool and has a shoreline that allows the cabinet to be cooled even when the engine is in the station,” Beville points out.

Beville says the rescue-pumpers are built on Typhoon chassis and cabs with 12-inch raised Vista roofs and are set up to carry five firefighters in 911 Seats seating, four of which are self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) seats. “The rescue-pumpers have Cummins 400-horsepower (hp) diesel engines, Allison 3000 EVS automatic transmissions, 20,000-pound Meritor front axles, and 27,000-pound Meritor rear axles,” Beville notes. Wheelbases are 220 inches, overall lengths are 36 feet 1 inch, and overall heights are 9 feet 5 inches.

 The four rescue-pumpers have Typhoon chassis and cabs with 12-inch raised Vista roofs, carry five firefighters, and are outfitted with Hale Qmax 1,750- gpm pumps and 750-gallon water tanks. (Photos courtesy of E-ONE.)

 The HR100 aerial ladder quint has a Typhoon chassis and cab with a 12-inch raised Vista roof and seating for five firefighters and is powered by a Cummins 450-hp L9 diesel engine and an Allison 3000 EVS automatic transmission with a Jacobs engine compression brake.

 The 100-foot aerial ladder quint built by E-ONE has a Hale DSM 1,500-gpm pump and a 500-gallon water tank.

The rescue-pumpers have 28-inch extended front bumpers with full-width covered compartments, Cassin says. “All of our front line engines are rescue-pumpers, where each crew is responsible for light rescue,” he notes. “So, the extended front bumpers each have Hurst Jaws of Life eDRAULIC® tools, a spreader, a cutter, and a ram in the front compartment.”

He says the rescue-pumpers have Hale Qmax 1,750-gallon-per-minute (gpm) pumps, 750-gallon water tanks, Hale pressure relief valves, and Task Force Tips deck guns with Extend-A-Guns. They have 6-inch and 2½-inch intakes on each side, 1¾-inch hoselines in the front bumpers, two 1¾-inch crosslays and one 2½-inch crosslay above the pump houses, 2½-inch discharges in the hosebeds, and ¾-inch valved decon discharges on the right sides of the pump houses.

The hose loads in the hosebeds, in dividers from left to right, include 100 feet of 1¾-inch hose, 1,000 feet of 5-inch large-diameter hose, 300 feet of 3-inch hose, 300 feet of 3-inch hose, 200 feet of 2½-inch hose, and 200 feet of 1¾-inch hose covered by electrically powered two-piece aluminum hosebed covers.

specs

E-ONE Rescue-Pumpers

  • Typhoon chassis and cabs with 12-inch raised Vista roofs and seating for 5 firefighters
  • 28-inch extended front bumpers with full-width covered compartments
  • Meritor 20,000-pound front axles
  • Meritor 27,000-pound single rear axles
  • Cummins 400-hp L9 engines
  • Allison 3000 EVS automatic transmissions
  • Hale Qmax 1,750-gpm pumps
  • 750-gallon water tanks
  • Task Force Tips deck guns with Extend-A-Guns
  • Whelen Freedom and Mini-Freedom LED light bars
  • Whelen LED warning light packages
  • Roto Ray LED warning lights at front
  • 2 Whelen Super LED 600 series scene lights
  • 2 HiViz FireTech LED scene lights
  • HiViz FireTech brow lights
  • Safety Vision TotalView 360-degree bird’s-eye-view cameras

E-ONE HR100 Aerial Ladder

specs

  • Typhoon chassis and cab with 12-inch raised Vista roof and seating for 5 firefighters
  • Sidestacker 4-jack 100-foot single-axle rear-mount aerial ladder
  • 28-inch extended front bumper with full-width covered compartment
  • Dana 20,000-pound front axle
  • Meritor 35,000-pound single rear axle
  • Hendrickson Roadmaxx air ride rear suspension
  • Cummins 450-hp L9 engine
  • Allison 3000 EVS automatic transmission
  • Jacobs engine compression brake
  • Hale DSM 1,550-gpm pump
  • 500-gallon water tank
  • Whelen Freedom and Mini-Freedom LED light bars
  • Whelen LED warning light package
  • Roto Ray LED warning light at front
  • 2 Whelen Pioneer LED scene lights
  • HiViz FireTech brow lights
  • Whelen LED traffic advisor
  • Safety Vision backup camera

Lighting includes Roto Ray LED warning lights at the front, Whelen LED warning light packages, Whelen Freedom and Mini-Freedom LED light bars, two Whelen 600 series Super LED scene lights, two HiViz FireTech LED scene lights, and HiViz FireTech brow lights. The rigs also have Safety Vision TotalView 360-degree bird’s-eye-view cameras, Federal Q2B sirens, and Federal Signal Dynamax speakers.

Beville notes that the HR100 aerial ladder quint is on a Typhoon chassis and cab with a 12-inch raised Vista roof and seating for five firefighters in 911 Seats seating, four of which are SCBA seats, with a SideStacker four-jack 100-foot rear-mount aerial ladder. The rig has a 28-inch extended front bumper with a full-width covered compartment and rides on a Dana 20,000-pound front axle and Meritor 35,00-pound single rear axle with Hendrickson Roadmaxx air ride suspension.

The aerial ladder quint is powered by a Cummins 450-hp L9 engine and an Allison 3000 EVS automatic transmission with a Jacobs engine compression brake and carries a Hale DSM 1,500-gpm pump and 500-gallon water tank. Lighting includes a Roto Ray LED warning light at the front, a Whelen LED warning light package, Whelen Freedom and Mini-Freedom LED light bars, two Whelen Pioneer LED scene lights, and HiViz FireTech brow lights. It also has a Safety Vision backup camera, a Federal Q2B siren, and a Federal Signal Dynamax speaker.


ALAN M. PETRILLO is a Tucson, Arizona-based journalist, the author of three novels and five nonfiction books, and a member of the Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment Editorial Advisory Board. He served 22 years with the Verdoy (NY) Fire Department, including in the position of chief.

Previous articleSylacauga (AL) Uses FEMA Funds to Buy New Fire Truck
Next articleDepartments Arrange Hosebeds from Simple to Complex, Depending on Operations

No posts to display