Ferrara Builds Rear-Mount Super Pumper for Bayway Refinery (NJ) Fire Department

Bayway Refinery's first-line pumper was starting to age, so the refinery replaced it with an Inferno Super Pumper built by Ferrara Fire Apparatus.

By Alan M. Petrillo

Bayway Refinery, located on New York Harbor in Linden, New Jersey, processes mainly light, low-sulfur crude oil, supplied to the refinery by tanker from Canada and West Africa, and from United States sources by rail and marine transport. The refinery’s infrastructure and employees are protected by 150 paid and volunteer firefighters operating out of Bayway Refinery Fire Department’s single station. The department’s first line pumper was 13 years old, and was starting to show its age, so the refinery replaced it with an Inferno Super Pumper built by Ferrara Fire Apparatus.

“We looked at the department’s needs and determined that we would be able to supply a super pumper because of the various size mains we have throughout the refinery,” says Anthony Muccia II, Bayway’s chief. “But our fire water hydrant system is 100% salt water, which is kind of rare, and we knew it would affect the construction of the fire pump because the metallurgy would have to last in a salt-water environment, so we went with an all-stainless steel pump. As far as the chassis, frame rails, and aluminum body are concerned, they are all hot-dipped galvanized, including the compartments, so there is no steel or exposed aluminum.”

Brad Williamson, Ferrara’s industrial product manager, says Ferrara built Bayway’s Super Pumper on an Inferno XMFD cab and chassis with 3/16-inch marine grade extruded aluminum body, powered by a Cummins 600-horsepower (hp) X15 diesel engine, and an Allison 4000 EVS automatic transmission. “The Super Pumper has a US Fire Pump rear-mount/side-controlled HVP 6250 pump rated at 6,000-gallons per minute (gpm),” Williamson notes, “a 900-gallon foam tank, a FoamPro AccuMax 2 direct injection foam system with a single electronic control Fusion 300-gpm foam control head, a Task Force Tips (TFT) 8,000-gpm main monitor, and twin TFT Monsoon 2,000-gpm rear monitors, all three of which are wireless remote controlled.”

Bayway Refinery (NJ) Fire Department had Ferrara Fire Apparatus build this Super Pumper on an Inferno XMFD cab and chassis, powered by a Cummins 600-horsepower (hp) diesel engine, and an Allison 4000 EVS automatic transmission. (Photo 1 courtesy of Bayway Refinery Fire Department.)

Williamson points out that the Bayway Super Pumper is designed around the concept of protecting close-proximity oil storage tanks while fighting a fire in another storage tank. “The rear of the Super Pumper has one 12-inch intake and four 8-inch intakes, two 6-inch discharges, two 3-inch discharges, and two 2-inch discharges for 1-3/4-inch hand lines,” Williamson says. “There also are two 6-inch discharges in the right-side pump panel.” He adds that the rear of the truck also has two TFT intake valves that can take pressure in either direction, making them multi-configurable, allowing them to feed a TFT Monsoon monitor from a separate source, while operating as a 6-inch discharge at the same time. “That allows the department a lot of versatility in one vehicle,” he observes.

The Ferrara-built Super Pumper for Bayway Refinery has a US Fire Pump rear-mount/side-controlled HVP 6250 pump rated at 6,000-gallons per minute (gpm), a 900-gallon foam tank, and a FoamPro AccuMax 2 direct injection foam system with single electronic control Fusion 300-gpm foam control head. (Photos 2-6 courtesy of Ferrara Fire Apparatus.)

Muccia notes that in training the department found the TFT Tsunami alone is capable of delivering close to 10,000-gpm, and that, operating all three monitors, the department has gotten 8,000-gpm out of the US Fire Pump. “In New Jersey, we have the Neptune mutual aid system that’s owned and deployed by various fire departments around the state,” he says. “If we have a large-scale incident, the Neptune system can come and support us where we would deploy submersible pumps in the waterway to supply a 12-inch hose to the Super Pumper’s rear 12-inch suction.”

Williamson says that the Bayway Super Pumper “has an extremely short wheelbase for an industrial pumper, only 177 inches, which allows it to get into tight spaces in the refinery, but the rear-mount pump means that the pumper has a bigger tail swing. However, the rear-mount pump allows them to back into a water source if they have to draft, and with the rear-mount panel at the left side rear, the operator is well away from the large diameter hose.”

Bayway Refinery’s other apparatus includes a 2014 E-ONE Cyclone 100-foot rear-mount aerial tower platform, a 2015 Freightliner 4,000-gallon tanker, a 2012 E-ONE Typhoon walk-around heavy rescue, a 1993 Ford F-800 hazardous materials truck, a command vehicle, an EMS unit, and a chief’s vehicle.

ALAN M. PETRILLO is a Tucson, Ariz.-based journalist, the author of three novels and five non-fiction books, and a member of the Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment editorial advisory board. He served 22 years with Verdoy (NY) Fire Department, including the position of chief.

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