Aerials

Many fire apparatus crashes are the result of the driver drifting off the road and then overcorrecting to regain control of the vehicle. When the driver overcorrects, he turns the wheel and creates an artificial curve in an otherwise straight road.
Aerials

One of the many ways that lateral g-force can contribute to a rollover crash is by inducing a “weight shift.” It is common to hear driver trainers and crash investigators refer to “weight shift.” But what is “weight shift,” and why is it bad?
Aerials

Under no circumstances should a fire apparatus operator drive so close to the upper limits of the apparatus’s capabilities! Driving in this manner leaves no room for error. Therefore, it is important for the fire apparatus operator to understand how to judge the amount of lateral g-force acting on a vehicle based on the sensation of g-force the driver experiences on his body.
Aerials

The moral of the story is this: as speed increases, or a curve gets sharper, the amount of lateral g-force acting on the vehicle will increase substantially.
Aerials

In this series of articles, we will examine some of the more serious safety issues faced by the fire apparatus operator. By reviewing recent case studies, it is apparent that our first topic should be that of fire apparatus rollovers. Rollovers are a common cause of fire apparatus crashes.
Aerials

Here are training ideas will help you demonstrate to your emergency vehicle operators the limited effective range of their apparatus sirens. CHRIS DALY
Aerials

How to safely and effectively remove apparatus stuck in the snow is an important but often overlooked aspect of driver training programs. CHRIS DALY