Equipment, Fire Apparatus

New Developments in Fire Scene Lighting

Issue 10 and Volume 25.

By Alan M. Petrillo

LED lighting has become the most popular type of lighting used on fire apparatus, from warning lights to scene lights to interior lighting. Manufacturers are continuing to come up with new designs and improvements to their LED fixtures with the aim of meeting the wide-ranging lighting needs of various fire and rescue situations.
Whelen Engineering Inc.

Whelen Engineering makes a wide range of scene lighting for fire apparatus, says Paul Deming, Whelen’s manager of fire and EMS sales, including the Pioneer™, Pioneer Plus™, Pioneer Summit™, Pioneer Micro™, ION™, and 900 series in various models. Deming says Whelen’s dual-panel Pioneer Super-LED® surface mount scene lights are gaining in popularity, compared with recessed scene lights. “They work very well with roll-up doors, where the drum housing the retracted door at the top of a compartment could be in the way of a recessed scene light fixture,” he points out.

Whelen Engineering Inc. makes the Pioneer Plus™ LED scene light that can use Whelen’s Proclera™ silicone optic, allowing both flood and spot lighting from a single lens.

1 Whelen Engineering Inc. makes the Pioneer Plus™ LED scene light that can use Whelen’s Proclera™ silicone optic, allowing both flood and spot lighting from a single lens. (Photo courtesy of Whelen Engineering Inc.)

James Stopa, Whelen’s senior sales engineer for fire and EMS, notes that Whelen has developed the Proclera™ silicone optic, available for all Pioneer series LED scene lights, which gives combination optics of both flood and spot lighting from a single lens. “We also make the ProFocus™ multiple-focal-point solid-state optic that allows from a 10-degree to 60-degree beam with no moving parts,” Stopa adds, “which is available in our Liberty II series light bar and the Arges remote control spotlight that can be rotated 360 degrees.” Whelen also makes the low-profile Pioneer Summit series LED light that can be mounted above the windshield line and incorporates spot and flood lights and also clearance and warning lights. “Summit can also be installed in various lengths on the side of fire trucks,” he says.


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Safe Fleet-FRC

Toh Meng, senior vice president of Safe Fleet’s Fire, EMS and Industrial Division, says FRC makes the SPECTRA LED High Rise scene light that allows firefighters to illuminate up to six stories of a building. “When mounted on a fire vehicle, the High Rise will illuminate the ground with 40 percent of its light, while 60 percent of it will be covering the second to sixth floor, with more concentration on the fifth and sixth floors of the structure because of the special design we use in the light’s optics,” Meng points out. “The SPECTRA LED High Rise is available in either 20,000 lumens or 30,000 lumens.”

afe Fleet’s FRC makes the SPECTRA-MAX LED lamp head with two rows of LEDs that have a 28,000-lumen light output.

2 Safe Fleet’s FRC makes the SPECTRA-MAX LED lamp head with two rows of LEDs that have a 28,000-lumen light output. (Photo courtesy of Safe Fleet’s Fire, EMS and Industrial Division.)

Meng notes that FRC’s SPECTRA-MAX LED lamp heads are popular on fire apparatus, providing two rows of intense flood LEDs with an output of 28,000 lumens. The lamp heads are available in 12/24 volts DC or 120/240 volts AC models, featuring 72 ultra-bright LEDs, 60 for flood and 12 for spot beam light patterns, he says. FRC’s SPECTRA-MAX-S LED lamp heads provide three rows of long distance spot LED lights and a bottom row of LED flood lights for a total of 28,000 lumens, Meng adds, with a specially engineered lens that gives the ability to view objects farther away as well as floodlight up the scene and work area. FRC also makes the SPECTRA-MS LED lamp head in a compact and slimmer style that provides 14,000 lumens of light.

IDEX Fire and Safety-Akron Brass Co. Weldon Division

Mike Frankowiak, director of OEM sales for IDEX Fire and Safety, says that Akron Brass Company’s Weldon Division makes the Revel Scout Portable LED Emergency Scene Light, the company’s newest offering in the fire market. “This tactical LED scene light is designed to increase the safety of firefighters and emergency responders on exterior scenes or inside dark spaces,” Frankowiak says. The Revel Scout scene light combines a spot and flood light pattern of 14,000 lumens; weighs 12 pounds; has a removable, rechargeable battery; and can be surface-mounted, hung, carried on a strap, or affixed to a spike.

Frankowiak points out that Weldon also makes the DC SceneStar LED Scene Light that produces 14,000 lumens and uses solid-state electronics to optimize thermal management for consistency and reliability; the 2×6 Diamondback LED emergency vehicle warning light lamp head available in a variety of lens color configurations; and LED dome, interior, utility, step well, and compartment lighting.

HiViz LED Lighting

Sam Massa, president of HiViz LED Lighting, says that HiViz has introduced the BG2 Modular Scene Lighting System. He says the backbone of the system is a four-inch-wide light module with a variety of circuits inside allowing spot, flood, scene, and warning/marker LEDs. “Systems can be configured from any number of modules, one to 19 modules wide, with each system requiring at least one two-inch controller,” he notes.

HiViz LED Lighting’s BG2 Modular Scene Lighting System, including the Gen 2 FireTech Brow Light, illuminates the night from this aerial apparatus.

3 HiViz LED Lighting’s BG2 Modular Scene Lighting System, including the Gen 2 FireTech Brow Light, illuminates the night from this aerial apparatus. (Photo courtesy of HiViz LED Lighting.)

Massa says, “The Gen 2 FireTech Brow Light is designed to produce the perfect beam pattern with the maximum volume of light in every application. The fixture incorporates a tight spot light, an extremely wide flood, and an asymmetrical down optic that shines more light in the front of the apparatus and is available in standard and smart options.”

HiViz also makes the Guardian LED surface-mounted scene light, a 7×9-inch 900 series fixture that produces 6,000 lumens of light output, and the Guardian Elite LED scene light, which produces 12,500 lumens. The Guardian series scene lights can be either surface- or pole-mounted.

Command Light

Roger Weinmeister, president of Command Light, says his company makes four versions of light towers for use on emergency apparatus: the SL Shadow, the KL Knight, the CL, and the C-Lite series. “The Shadow series now has 360-degree rotation and a 4½-foot reach or up to a 6½-foot reach with an optional arm extension,” Weinmeister says. “The KL Knight series is a mid-range light tower with a 7½-foot reach, while our CL series is our largest tower with an 11-foot reach. We also make the C-Lite series, which is great for command units, can rotate 360 degrees, and has a 120-degree tilt.”

Command Light makes the KL Knight series light tower, shown here with six LED light heads.

4 Command Light makes the KL Knight series light tower, shown here with six LED light heads. (Photo courtesy of Command Light.)

Weinmeister points out that the various models come in either AC or DC power configurations and that some series can carry up to eight light heads. “Many departments choose a four-light head option, which is good for mid-range scene lighting,” he says. “The light heads we use are the Whelen PFP4 in the 40,000-lumen range, the FRC Spectra-Max producing 28,000 lumens, and the HiViz Helios giving 14,000 lumens.”

Will-Burt

Dave Cotsmire, director of marketing for Will-Burt, says his company makes a number of versions of its Night Scan light tower. The Night Scan Vertical rises to 30 feet, the Night Scan Xtreme to 25 feet, the Night Scan Powerlite to 15 feet, and the Night Scan Vertical Complete to 7½ feet. Will-Burt also makes the Night Scan Profiler Light Fixture, Cotsmire notes, a space-saving, scene lighting, roof-mounted unit in widths from 15 to 21 inches; the Night Scan Scout, which installs anywhere on a vehicle and produces 40,000 lumens; and the Night Scan Spot, a rotatable, remote-controlled LED light that tilts up 70 degrees and down 45 degrees.

Will-Burt makes the Night Scan light tower, shown here with Sirion light heads developed in partnership with HiViz LED Lighting.

5 Will-Burt makes the Night Scan light tower, shown here with Sirion light heads developed in partnership with HiViz LED Lighting. (Photo courtesy of Will-Burt.)

Cotsmire adds that Will-Burt offers Whelen and FRC light fixtures on its light towers and has partnered with HiViz to develop LED scene lighting specifically for its towers. “We have three versions,” he says. “The X200 is a 20,000-lumen light head; the XL200 also produces 20,000 lumens but with a wider spread; and the Sirion produces 220,000 lumens. Sirion is a two-light-head system with three types of optics in it—long-range optics of 400 to 500 feet, midrange optics for wider spread of light, and near optics to light up around the apparatus itself. It won’t leave any dark areas.”

Streamlight

Mike Dineen, Streamlight’s vice president of sales and marketing, says Streamlight Inc. makes the Portable Scene Light, Portable Scene Light EXT, and Portable Scene Light II for use on emergency scenes. The Portable Scene Light and the EXT models are identical in lighting specifications, each having a 5,300-lumen output, a narrow footprint, a 90-degree swivel neck, and deployability in less than 30 seconds. The EXT version extends to 84 inches, compared with the 72-inch extension of the Portable Scene Light model. Both versions are powered by a 12-volt sealed lead acid battery that’s rechargeable up to 500 times. Dineen adds that Streamlight’s Vulcan 180 handheld lantern also can be deployed as a scene light.

Dineen notes that Streamlight’s Portable Scene Light II is a 10,000-lumen rechargeable waterproof light with a 360-degree rotating head on a steel frame that can be stacked with up to three light units. The light offers a range of brightness run times, with a maximum brightness run time of two hours and a low setting of 20 percent (2,300 lumens) for 11 hours. The light is powered by two rechargeable lithium ion battery packs that charge in six hours and continue to charge the light and operate while plugged into an AC or DC power source.

FoxFury Lighting Solutions

Mario Cugini, chief executive officer of FoxFury Lighting Solutions, says FoxFury makes the Nomad® 360 Scene Light, a battery-operated light with a built-in tripod that extends up to 8½ feet tall and delivers up to 8,000 lumens. “The cordless, rechargeable LED light can operate as a spotlight, flood light, or 360-degree scene light with a run time of up to 24 hours,” Cugini points out.

FoxFury Lighting Solutions makes the Nomad

6 FoxFury Lighting Solutions makes the Nomad® Transformer scene light with a built-in tripod that extends up to 12 feet 9 inches and produces 16,000 lumens of light. (Photo courtesy of FoxFury Lighting Solutions.)

Akron Brass Company’s Weldon Division makes the Revel Scout Portable LED Emergency Scene Light, which weighs 12 pounds and combines a spot and flood light pattern of 14,000 lumens.

7 Akron Brass Company’s Weldon Division makes the Revel Scout Portable LED Emergency Scene Light, which weighs 12 pounds and combines a spot and flood light pattern of 14,000 lumens. (Photo courtesy of IDEX Fire and Safety Akron Brass Company’s Weldon Division.)

Streamlight Inc. makes the Portable Scene Light II, a 10,000-lumen rechargeable waterproof light with a 360-degree rotating head.

8 Streamlight Inc. makes the Portable Scene Light II, a 10,000-lumen rechargeable waterproof light with a 360-degree rotating head. (Photo courtesy of Streamlight Inc.)

FoxFury also makes the Nomad Prime portable scene light with built-in tripod legs that extend to eight feet tall and deliver 5,000 lumens; the Nomad NOW, a compact scene light with a built-in carrying handle that delivers 3,000 lumens of lighting; and the Nomad Transformer scene light with built-in tripod legs that extend up to 12 feet 9 inches and deliver up to 16,000 lumens of light.


ALAN M. PETRILLO is a Tucson, Arizona-based journalist, the author of three novels and five nonfiction books, and a member of the Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment Editorial Advisory Board. He served 22 years with the Verdoy (NY) Fire Department, including in the position of chief.