Aerials, Apparatus, E-ONE, Petrillo

Fast-Growing Community Gains Extra Reach with New E-ONE Aerial

Issue 12 and Volume 21.

By Alan M. Petrillo

The Zionsville (IN) Fire Department faced the problem of a rapidly growing community in the fastest growing county in the state, where single-family residences and other buildings were set back considerable distances from roadway access, making it difficult to reach many of them with the E-ONE 95-foot midmount aerial ladder the department was running.

1 The Zionsville (IN) Fire Department chose to have E-ONE build it a CR137 aerial ladder to reach many of the homes in its district where setbacks and the sizes of homes prevented roof operations with shorter ladders. (Photos courtesy of E-ONE unless otherwise noted.)
1 The Zionsville (IN) Fire Department chose to have E-ONE build it a CR137 aerial ladder to reach many of the homes in its district where setbacks and the sizes of homes prevented roof operations with shorter ladders. (Photos courtesy of E-ONE unless otherwise noted.)

“Our midmount, while maneuverable, was causing us difficulty with some homes,” James C. VanGorder, Zionsville’s chief, says. “We were not able to reach the typical home in the community. We would set up and find ourselves short for roof use, and the setbacks and size of the houses were the two biggest issues we were facing.”

VanGorder says that the department’s midmount only had a 300-gallon water tank on it, and he wasn’t comfortable with that size, as well as the problem of reach. “We tried to find a quint that worked for us but were not able to. But, then we sold our midmount before the end of its useful life so we could get a good amount of money for it.”

2 The E-ONE aerial ladder for Zionsville also has a Waterous CMU 2,000-gpm two-stage pump, a UPF Poly III 500-gallon water tank, and all Akron Brass valves with a stainless steel manifold.
2 The E-ONE aerial ladder for Zionsville also has a Waterous CMU 2,000-gpm two-stage pump, a UPF Poly III 500-gallon water tank, and all Akron Brass valves with a stainless steel manifold.

Extended Reach

After a neighboring fire department took delivery of a 127-foot ladder, Zionsville’s truck committee brought in various manufacturers’ rigs with ladders in 100-, 105-, 110-, 127-, and 137-foot lengths to test those products. “We set up at the same addresses and used the same scenarios to evaluate each of them,” Brian Miller, deputy chief of operations, says. “We wanted to see if we could reach the roof line each time and be able to do an effective roof operation. We also looked at whether we could move right or left, up or back with the ladder, and still have reach capability.”

Miller pointed out that the truck committee also considered travel length and setup width of the various aerial ladders they researched. “We wanted to be sure that we didn’t have a vehicle that would close down the whole road with its setup,” he says. “In addition, we also wanted a maneuverable vehicle because a lot of our subdivisions are one way in and out.”

3 The CR137 uses crisscross underslung outriggers that give the truck a 13-foot, 8-inch jack spread.
3 The CR137 uses crisscross underslung outriggers that give the truck a 13-foot, 8-inch jack spread.

Miller notes that the committee measured placement of the various rigs at the test sites, photographed angles of approach for the ladders, looked at the safety ratios of the aerials, and “essentially studied all the pros and cons of each one.”

The choice Zionsville made was a 2016 CR137 E-ONE 137-foot welded extruded aluminum aerial ladder with a 2.5:1 structural safety factor built on a Cyclone chassis with an extruded aluminum cab with a split raised roof and severe duty interior. The CR137 is powered by a Cummins 550-horsepower ISX 15 diesel engine with a Jacobs compression brake and an Allison EVS 4500P automatic transmission. Miller says that E-ONE’s four crisscross underslung jacks, two at the midpoint of the truck and two at the rear, give solid stability for the rig while using the smallest footprint possible.

4 The tip of the 137-foot ladder truck carries Welen Vertex LED warning lights and two Whelen Pioneer PSP1 LED scene lights.
4 The tip of the 137-foot ladder truck carries Welen Vertex LED warning lights and two Whelen Pioneer PSP1 LED scene lights.

Also on the rig is a Waterous CMU 2,000-gallon-per-minute (gpm) pump, a UPF Poly III 500-gallon water tank, all Akron Brass valves with a stainless steel manifold, a Task Force Tips Monsoon 1,750-gpm electric monitor at the tip of the aerial, and two 200-foot 1¾-inch crosslays recessed in a 12-inch-high severe-duty front bumper.

Complex and Custom

Joe Hedges, E-ONE’s product manager for chassis and aerials, says, “This is a very complex truck. The department wanted to customize it to meet their requirements, which ranged from simple bolt-on items to a custom body configuration with extended-height compartments, enclosed pump panels, the water tank, hard suction storage, custom wheel well compartments, and a through-the-tank ground ladder storage compartment for 127 feet of ground ladders.”

5 For master stream water flow, the CR137 has a Task Force Tips electronic monitor on the aerial.
5 For master stream water flow, the CR137 has a Task Force Tips electronic monitor on the aerial.

Hedges says that because of all the customization, the preconstruction meeting was a multiday affair that took a lot of effort by the truck committee and the E-ONE team of engineers, designers, and product managers. “Looking at the drawing for the truck and looking at the order made, there were dozens of custom things that we put together on this truck,” he says, “like stainless steel knurled hand rails, a laser at the tip of the aerial, and a special drop bracket brow light across the front of the vehicle that allowed the aerial’s waterway to be notched into the cab roof.”

Jim Castellano, sales manager for Fire Service Inc., who sold the rig to Zionsville, says, “These days, an aerial device is more about reach than height. You might have to get to a 6,000-square-foot house that sits 100 feet off the street instead of getting to a window on a 10-story building.” Castellano notes that the Zionsville aerial “is the most thought-out project I’ve ever had” and congratulated the truck committee and department for their foresight and attention to detail in developing what they wanted the truck to be able to do. “As an example, we had to maximize the hosebed space on this aerial to carry 800 feet of five-inch large-diameter hose and 400 feet of three-inch hose,” he says. “We also had to provide the compartment space for all of the rescue equipment they wanted to carry, developed a customized cab for them, and a transverse compartment for a Stokes basket and backboards.”

6 Zionsville’s CR137 ladder easily reaches the roof of a large house set well back from the street during this evening fire call for a house hit by lightning. [Photo courtesy of the Zionsville (IN) Fire Department.]
6 Zionsville’s CR137 ladder easily reaches the roof of a large house set well back from the street during this evening fire call for a house hit by lightning. [Photo courtesy of the Zionsville (IN) Fire Department.]

The Zionsville crew is pleased with their longer-reach ladder. “We are now able to access a lot of houses that we previously could not get to,” says Jason Potts, Zionsville captain at Ladder Station 93. “And, the proximity sensor lasers at the tip show the distance and elevation from the building, which helps us with the depth perception on such a long ladder.”

Hedges sums up the project by praising the Zionsville truck committee. “They were great to work with,” he says. “They understood there are physical limitations to some of the things they were asking for, but we were able to meet all of their requirements.”

7 The CR137 aerial ladder demonstrates it can handily go over roadside obstructions to reach a house set back from the street. [Photo courtesy of the Zionsville (IN) Fire Department.]
7 The CR137 aerial ladder demonstrates it can handily go over roadside obstructions to reach a house set back from the street. [Photo courtesy of the Zionsville (IN) Fire Department.]

ALAN M. PETRILLO is a Tucson, Arizona-based journalist, the author of three novels and five nonfiction books, and a member of the Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment editorial advisory board. He served 22 years with the Verdoy (NY) Fire Department, including in the position of chief.

8 Zionsville wanted to give recognition of its firefighters to the community, so it has large lighted name signs placed on each side of the aerial and lit the ladder with green LED night lighting. [Photo courtesy of the Zionsville (IN) Fire Department.]
8 Zionsville wanted to give recognition of its firefighters to the community, so it has large lighted name signs placed on each side of the aerial and lit the ladder with green LED night lighting. [Photo courtesy of the Zionsville (IN) Fire Department.]

specs

E-ONE CR137 Aerial Ladder

  • E-ONE Cyclone chassis and 67.5-inch extruded aluminum cab with split raised roof and severe-duty interior
  • IMMI 4Front and RollTek air bags
  • Wheel well and rear medical cabinets
  • Bostrom seats for four with IMMI SmartDock self-contained breathing apparatus brackets
  • Severe-duty 12-inch-high front bumper with recessed double crosslays of 200 feet of 1¾-inch double jacket hose
  • Extruded aluminum body with enclosed pump panels and SideStacker hosebed
  • Rescue-style extended-height compartments with ROM roll-up doors
  • 250-inch wheelbase
  • 11-foot, 10-inch overall height
  • 44-foot, 7-inch overall length
  • 78,000-pound gross vehicle weight rating
  • Cummins ISX15 550-horsepower engine with Jacobs compression brake
  • Allison EVS 4500P automatic transmission
  • 137-foot welded extruded aluminum aerial ladder with 2.5:1 structural safety factor
  • Crisscross underslung outriggers with 13-foot, 8-inch jack spread
  • Laser jack pad spotting lights
  • Advanced Aerial Control System with tip controls
  • Command Light L-CAS laser collision avoidance system
  • Task Force Tips Monsoon electric monitor at tip
  • Whelen Vertex LED warning lights and two Whelen Pioneer PSP1 LED lights at tip
  • Amdor LED ladder climbing lights
  • 127 feet of ground ladders center mounted in water tank tunnel
  • Brackets for 16- and 20-foot roof ladders, two pike poles, and Stokes basket on base of aerial
  • 9,000-pound outrigger tie-off package
  • Waterous CMU 2,000-gpm two-stage pump
  • UPF Poly III 500-gallon water tank
  • Akron Brass valves with stainless steel manifold
  • Weldon V-MUX multiplex electrical system
  • Vehicle data recorder with CrewGuard occupant detection
  • Harrison 8-kW hydraulic generator
  • Whelen Mini-Freedom LED light bars, upper and lower level warning lights
  • LED Roto-Ray light
  • Tomar directional bar
  • ROM V4 compartment lights
  • Whelen 600 LED scene lights
  • FireTech 72-inch and two 46-inch 12-volt brow lights
  • Four FRC Spectra 120-volt LED portable scene lights
  • Carson SA-441M siren and Federal Signal Q2B siren
  • Safety Vision backup camera

Price without equipment: $1,126,598

department

Zionsville (IN) Fire Department

Strength: Combination department with 122 total staff, 50 percent full-time paid firefighters, 18 percent part-time paid firefighters, 27 percent volunteer firefighters, 5 percent support services; four stations.

Service area: Provides fire protection, rescue, and EMS services to a 72-square-mile district located in the fastest growing county in Indiana.

Other apparatus: 2010 KME pumper 2,000-gpm pump, 750-gallon water tank, 30-gallon A and B foam tanks; 2009 KME pumper, 2,000-gpm pump, 750-gallon water tank, 30-gallon A and B foam tanks; 1996 E-ONE pumper in reserve, 1,500-gpm pump, 1,000-gallon water tank; 2000 S&S tanker, 500-gpm pump, 3,000-gallon water tank; 1999 UST tanker, 500-gpm pump, 3,000-gallon water tank; 2006 Ford F-350 brush truck, CET skid pump unit, 300-gallon water tank; 1992 Oshkosh T3000 aircraft rescue and firefighting truck; 2014 KME tactical support/breathing air truck; 2011 SuperVac/Spartan heavy rescue; mobile command trailer; two Braun Chief series ambulances, one Horton Ford F-450 ambulance; battalion chiefs vehicles.