Special Delivery: Anaheim (CA) Fire Department Moves to Crimson Rear-Mount Pumpers

 (1) Anaheim (CA) Fire and Rescue turned to Crimson Fire for two rear-mount pumpers to use in its first line fleet.
(1) Anaheim (CA) Fire and Rescue turned to Crimson Fire for two rear-mount pumpers to use in its first line fleet. (Photos courtesy of Anaheim Fire and Rescue.)
 (2) Crimson Fire built a front bumper with two recessed electronic sirens, two air horns, and a manual siren, along with 20 feet of preconnected suction and 100 feet of preconnected 1¾-inch hose for the department.
(2) Crimson Fire built a front bumper with two recessed electronic sirens, two air horns, and a manual siren, along with 20 feet of preconnected suction and 100 feet of preconnected 1¾-inch hose for the department.
 (3) The speedlays on the two Crimson Fire pumpers sit under the firefighters' gear compartments.
(3) The speedlays on the two Crimson Fire pumpers sit under the firefighters' gear compartments.
 (4) The Crimson Fire rear-mount pumpers each have a Hale 1,500-gpm pump, a 500-gallon water tank, and two integral foam tanks.
(4) The Crimson Fire rear-mount pumpers each have a Hale 1,500-gpm pump, a 500-gallon water tank, and two integral foam tanks.

The Anaheim (CA) Fire Department (Anaheim Fire and Rescue) needed to replace two pumpers in its first-line pumper fleet of 10 engines but hadn't purchased a new pumper in nearly ten years. So a battalion chief and a captain got the nod to research features of the rigs being run by other fire departments in the area to see if some of those elements could be integrated into two new Anaheim pumpers. The result of their work was an order for two 2010 rear-mount pumpers from Crimson Fire.

Financing the Order

Anaheim Fire and Rescue was fortunate to get a Federal Assistance for Firefighters Grant through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for $480,000, which required a 20 percent fire department match, bringing the total grant to $600,000, says Rusty Coffelt, Anaheim's deputy chief of support services.

Coffelt said Dennis Hamilton, then battalion chief in charge of apparatus and since retired, along with Captain Jeff Alario, began developing specifications for the new pumpers three years ago but were delayed because of budget restrictions. That meant getting an extension on the grant because of paperwork issues. Ultimately, the bidding process began at the end of 2009.

"We have a competitive bidding process that goes online and also have a preconference where bidders can come to us to ask questions and request exceptions," Coffelt says. "Amendments are made and purchasing sends out the requests for bids, so everyone is bidding on the same thing. The lowest bidder wins the award."

The department attracted four bidders: American LaFrance, Rosenbauer, KME, and Crimson Fire, with Crimson winning the bid for the rear-mount pumpers in 2010.

Department-Specific Specs

Alario says that the pumpers needed a California-compliant engine exhaust system and at the time the only choice was a Caterpillar engine, which the bid included, along with an Allison transmission to match.

The specs for the two units required several unusual elements, including a gear compartment for the firefighters in the back of the cab that was accessible from inside and outside the cab, a front bumper that carried an assortment of equipment in flush-mounted fashion, a pump operator's compartment in the last compartment on the driver's side, and length and height restrictions.

Crimson Fire put together the pumpers on 2010 Spartan Gladiator chassis with Gladiator MFD (medium four-door) cabs and five-inch raised roofs, says Manny Perez, sales manager for Emergency Vehicle Group Inc., the Anaheim-based dealer for Crimson in Southern California. "They were very enthusiastic about the Spartan chassis and cab," Perez says. "They asked for a very customized vehicle that could replicate their current rigs without much deviation. They were looking for uniformity, and we were able to accommodate them on that but bring in new technology as well."

Unit Specifics

Anaheim Fire and Rescue runs four firefighters per pumper, although the two Crimson pumpers have a fifth seat fitted behind the officer's seat. A compartment for miscellaneous equipment is located behind the driver's seat in the rear section of the cab.

The two firefighters in the rear are seated along the back wall facing forward with a roll-up door compartment between them that accesses their gear, located in compartments behind the cab's rear wall. The two gear compartments also are accessible from outside the pumper on both the driver's and officer's sides. Alario says Anaheim also repositioned an ax from the rear cab door to a gear compartment door for better accessibility.

Coffelt points out that Anaheim had Crimson install Ziamatic self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) mounts that are "a big improvement over strap mounts." The new Ziamatic mounts hold at the top of the SCBA bottle, he says, which makes removal easier.

Size Restrictions

Alario notes that all of Anaheim's pumpers are paramedic engines. So by moving the pump from the midship position to the rear meant picking up two compartments on the vehicle, something the department sought.

Perez points out that all of the discharges on the pumpers are off the rear, except for the speedlays, which sit under the firefighters' gear compartments instead of over the wheel well. "It allows maximum room in the cab," he says. "It's something new for us, borrowed from Crimson's Transformer, where it's an option."

Perez says that Anaheim had both height and length restrictions to work with on the two new pumpers because they had to fit into older firehouses. "They have a couple of older stations in the department, so we had to adhere to a shorter length of 29 feet, eight inches overall," Perez says. "There were height restrictions too, where the specs called for a flat roof. But we were able to move the warning lights to the side of the cab and give them a five-inch raised roof, making the overall height nine feet five inches."

Alario notes the front bumper took a great deal of planning because of all the equipment the department wanted in it. "Working with Crimson was great because they were able to get two air horns, two electronic sirens, and one manual siren all recessed into the front bumper," Alario says. "There's also 20 feet of hose preconnected to the front suction, 100 feet of 1¾-inch preconnected to a discharge, and a small compartment for a mallet and two hydrant wrenches."

The pumpers each carry a Hale 1,500-gallon-per-minute (gpm) pump, a 500-gallon water tank with two integral foam tanks (for Class A and Class B foam), and room for 1,000 feet of large-diameter hose in the hosebed.

Coffelt says the two new Crimson pumpers are firsts for the department in a number of ways. They are the first rear-mount pumpers, first with all electronic valves, first with "black boxes," first with National Fire Protection Association-required reflective material on the rear, and first with independent front suspensions. "The handling and turning ability is superior to the other first-line pumpers that we have," says Coffelt. "They are a couple of feet shorter overall, and the maneuverability is very good. It's the nicest ride I've ever had in a fire engine."


ALAN M. PETRILLO is a Tucson, Arizona-based freelance writer and is a member of the Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment editorial advisory board. He served 22 years with the Verdoy (NY) Fire Department, including in the position of chief.

Anaheim (CA) Fire and Rescue

Strength: more than 300 personnel, including 216 firefighters, 12 stations, providing fire suppression, rescue, and emergency medical services.

Service area: covers the city of Anaheim, a major tourist destination in Southern California, with a resident base of more than 300,000 people. The service area includes city and suburban settings; commercial and industrial complexes; and large facilities such as Disneyland, Angel Stadium of Anaheim, the Anaheim Convention Center, and the Honda Center.

Other apparatus: eight Saulsbury engine companies, three Crimson Fire truck companies, one LTI, one Bronto, one Type I hazmat response unit, one urban search and rescue (USAR) unit, one swift water rescue unit, two battalion chief vehicles.


Crimson Fire Rear-Mount Pumper

  • 2010 Spartan Gladiator chassis
  • Gladiator MFD (medium four-door) cab with five-inch raised roof
  • Extruded aluminum body
  • 20,000-pound IFS front axle
  • 27,000-pound air suspension rear axle
  • 1671⁄2-inch wheelbase
  • 18-inch stainless steel bumper extension
  • Caterpillar 525-hp HP C-13 diesel engine
  • Allison 4500 EVS transmission
  • Hale RM 1,500-gpm pump
  • 500-gallon Poly water tank with two 20-gallon foam tanks
  • Rear-mount pump controls
  • Crimson Control XT pressure governor
  • Foam Pro 2002 (A&B) supplies four discharges
  • Two preconnected speedlays
  • One front-bumper discharge
  • All roll-up doors on compartments
  • Pac-Trac pull-out tool boards
  • Extinguisher and SCBA storage in body
  • Whelen upper and lower LED lighting
  • Whelen LED direction light bar on rear
  • Whelen scene lighting

Price without equipment: $527,000

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